THROW BACK THURSDAY - EVOLUTION OF TEMPSAFE


A Resolution was passed at the 1991 annual general meeting that simple labeling was needed to indicate to consumers and food handlers which foods were perishable; the need for this food to be kept either hot or cold; and what temperature hot food should be held/displayed at.


Whereas, at present in Canada there is no symbol or symbols to advise consumers which foods are potentially hazardous; and


Whereas, it would be beneficial to clearly indicate to both consumers and merchants which foods are potentially hazardous and must be kept either hot or cold and what temperature they must be kept at; and


Whereas, temperature abuse of potentially hazardous foods is a major cause of food poisoning;

Therefore, Be It Resolved that CIPHI approach government agencies and industry to support the creation of a symbol or symbols to advise consumers and merchants which foods are potentially hazardous and at what temperatures they should be stored.


Moved Tim Roark Seconded by Peter Parys CARRIED August 1, 1991 CIPHI AGM, Edmonton, Alberta


During the period 1992-93, prototype designs were developed and the concept for using the temperature symbols on supermarket display cases and other food equipment was presented to a national Food Regulation Review Committee. The intent was to have the same symbol on display cases; food packages as a safety message; and continuity of recognition for the consumer.


During the period 1993-94, The National Sanitation Foundation (NSF International today) was consulted for a legal opinion. Positive support of the temperature symbol concept was received. Advice on the copyright and trademark process was received. The project was transferred from National CIPHI to the EHFC.


Copyright registration was received in 1995 for the Safety is….symbols.


Registration process for trademark of all the symbols was initiated in 1996.


Approval was achieved for the “Safety is….” in 1998 which allowed for the development of the TempSafe national food safety strategy using the temperature symbols.



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The Charitable Division of the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors